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How to get a job in Congress: How to get a Congressional Internship
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How to get a job in Congress: Part 1- How to get a Congressional Internship


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It’s been a while since my last post, far to long actually but then again a lot has happened.  I moved to DC in April ’11 and was lucky enough to find a congressional internship, which then turned into a full time staff job in August.  The thing that frustrated me the most about the whole process was how frustratingly little I knew about it, and how hard to access any reliable info through the web.  It seemed impossible to actually get my foot in the door to get a job on the hill.  With that in mind I’ve decided to do a series, at least three parts, on how to obtain a job working in congress.   I know when I was first looking for a job on the hill I emailed my resume, wrote cover letters to every single job posting that I might qualify for, and they all disappeared down a black hole.  I was lucky if I got a rejection/considering others letter.  For most I received no response.

This is the first article in that series, and quite possibly the most important.  The not so secret thing about staffers on the hill is that almost all of them have interned in a congressional office before they were staffers.  Of our permanent staff in our office, 90% of us interned before we received a paid job.  While this seems awful, having to work for free before someone will eventually, maybe, hopefully pay you, the system is there for a reason.  I can safely say that without the internship experience, I wouldn’t be capable from day 1 in my current position.  And that’s really the thing on the hill, you need to be capable from day 1, and office can’t afford for you not to be.   That’s why those with experience are always the top choice.

I’ll quickly mention the two ways to get a job on the hill without interning, but I’m not going to focus on them as they’re a much more rare route.  Many times staffers will come from working as campaign staff on a congressional campaign to the hill.  You’re best bet for this would be to find a campaign that doesn’t currently hold a seat.   The problem with this strategy?  Most times the incumbent wins, it’s just statistics.  The other route is to work for a 3rd party group or think tank, and then transfer into a legislative assistant/correspondent position based on your expertise on a particular issue.

But for most of us, interning is the only way to get our foot through the door in the hill.  These tips that I’m giving are from both personal experience from when I was seeking an internship, and  in my current role I’m in charging of choosing our office’s interns each semester.  Now some of this will vary from office to office, as each is run differently, but the base advise will stay the same, regardless of which chamber, party or state your looking for.

There are basically three different intern seasons on the hill.  The spring semester (Jan to May), Summer (June- Aug) and the fall (Sept-Dec).  The most crowded of these is the summer semester.  This is generally when most interns are in town, and it’s also the most competitive due to the large number of applicants.  It’s generally a little bit easier to get an internship in the fall or spring as there are less applicants.  The fall and spring are generally better times to intern as well because you’ll be here longer so you will get to do much more, especially policy and hearing wise during the course of your internship.  Most offices have deadline dates for when to apply for the internship which are listed on the website.  An easy way to find the site address for almost every site (for the house at least) is congresspersonslastname.house.gov

Hopefully you are better prepared than I was and are reading this in college looking for an internship before you even worry about graduation.   If so you have a leg up, most universities run some type of dc internship program.  If your school offers one of these I highly recommend you apply for one of these  spots every year that you can.  As someone who chooses interns, we really like to pick from these programs as most require a lengthy application process, essay writing, recommendations etc which show us that the applicant really is dedicated to getting this internship.  It’s just less of a gamble to for us to choose these applicants, as we know they know it’s a prestigious internship, not a summer vacation.  Many of these programs will also pay for food and housing while you’re here, or at least give you some form of stipend as well.

If your school doesn’t offer an internship program there are many outside groups that do.  Make sure and apply for all of these that you can.  A great example of one would be the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) internship.  This program pays for practically all of your living expenses and even gives you some spending money.  There are tons of programs out there like this, and the best part is they generally do the placement for you.  You just have to get accepted by them.  Make sure an exhaust google looking for opportunities like these.  Many think tank, advocacy causes and groups offer these scholarships.

And what if you’ve already graduated from school and no longer qualify for any of these programs?  Are you out of luck completely?  I can promise you’re not as I’m living proof that it can be surmounted if that’s what you want to do.  But to be honest you are at a big disadvantage.  The reason its so much easier to get an internship through a college or advocacy group is that these organizations have lasting relations with congressional offices, know who to contact, and as Intern Coordinators we really do like to pick their interns as the last ones they provided generally did an excellent job.  The problem is when you’re just emailing every single office based on the intern link on their homepage, that’s all you are, an email.  Unless you have an unbelievable resume, and trust me, most applicants to congressional internships have amazing resumes, so you have to top amazing not just good, you won’t stand out from the crowd.  It really is hard to make a connection online that will turn into something more.

With that said, the best thing you can do if you’re looking for an internship on the hill post graduation, is move to DC.  I can’t stress how big this is.  I can honestly say this was the thing the that most contributed to me getting an internship.  The thing that you have when you’re in DC that no one else has, is instant availability.   I know it scary moving to city without any prospect of a job but you have to take that leap.  If you need to work and save up money for year to move here, if you have parents or friends or family, ask them if they’d be willing to support/help you for a few months.  Whatever you do, find a way.

When you’re here you need to get your resume, cover letters and recommendations out immediately.  The first place you start is your home congressional district as well as your two senators if they are the same party affiliation as you.  I’m from a heavily republican district in Texas, so that as well as the two senate offices were out as a choice for me.  You generally want to stay with the party you align with, while there is still some crossing of the isle staff wise between very very moderate members, this is becoming a rare occurrence.  The next place you look after this, is anyone from your state that’s in the same party.  After that, go for comittee members on a comittee that you have the most experience with.  Offices really like staffers/interns from their own district.  The next ones that they go for are generally those from the same state.  Offices, espeically Texas offices can be very regional.  We like people who understand/have experience with the dynamics of the populace that we work for.  It again just makes things easier.  What you’re doing here is targeting your search attacking the places most likely to yield a positive result for you.

Now what you’re going to do to try and get an internship in these targeted is offices is have a perfect resume (will be discussed in the next post), and I can’t stress this enough: a targeted cover letter designed specifically for that individual office.  In this cover letter you need to play up any experience you have had in that district.  Played a game of football there in high school, well you now experience with the districts schools.  Even if you’ve just driven through it, say you know something about the district.  The other thing to include on this letter is your experience with the Member’s committee assignments.  You need to look up what committee’s they’re on, including sub committee’s and really play up any strengths that you have there.  These strengths can included advanced courses in college, interests, clubs etc.   If you have a huge amount of foreign policy experience (the most common for intern applications-  We have way too many IR majors apply) but the member you are applying to serves on Agriculture and Ways and Means you’re experience really doesn’t count for much.  An office can generally always use help with committee assignments, because those LA’s (Legislative Assistants) that have committee work, have masses and masses of work.  It sounds crass but you really are selling yourself as a product to the office, and the product the office needs is the person who will help it the most.

To submit these resumes, covers and recommendations you are not going to submit them online.  You’re going to do it the old fashioned way by dropping them off in each office on the hill.  All of our offices are open to visitors, no appointment necessary so you can just walk right in.  This is a very common thing on the hill so don’t think we’ll look down on you or be aghast.  When you go into each office, ask if that office’s intern coordinator has a moment to speak with you.  If they do, sit down and sell yourself shortly and inquire if the there’s any open room in the office, even if it’s just for one or two days a week as an intern.  If the Coordinator is not there, get their card, drop your resume, cover etc off with the Staff Assistant (Person at the front desk) and then follow up that day with an email to the intern coordinator.  If you don’t hear back within a week, email again.  Keep pestering each office once a week with an email/call until you get a definite no.  Tenacity can pay off big time here.  We’re very busy and often forget to check on what we say we’ll check on for you.   You need to hold our feet to the fire and keep us responsible for getting an answer to you.

Now hopefully if you tailor your search and cover letter like I said you should hopefully get a call back in the first 3 weeks.  After dropping off my info, I received a call for an interview in under 2 weeks without even emailing to check up on any them (A big mistake I now realize).  Most offices will either do an interview with you over the phone, or in person.  This goes without saying this but treat this interview just as you would one for your dream job.  They will ask you many questions about how you can handle certain situations.  One that is commonly asked is how you would handle an irate constituent on the phone.  My answer here (coming from my telemarketer experience) is that an angry phone calls really just wants to be heard, so make sure and listen attentively and whatever you do not attempt to argue or downplay their concerns.  Make sure you’re comfortable answering phones, talking to people, play up research experience from college, note taking etc, organizational skill.  We like a well rounded person with job experience, but there is no sure fire way here, just play to what you’re strengths are.

 

Hopefully at this point you’ll have been offered some form of internship.  The last piece of advice for this article is no matter how small or short an internship is that is offered to you, make sure and take it.  My original offer of an internship was in April for two weeks long, and I now have a full time position in the office.  I was helping the office out in between when the spring interns ended and before the summer interns started.  I was told when I started that there was no guarantee the internship would go longer than two weeks, and that most of the space was full.  But the secret is, once you get an internship if you bust your butt and do a great job they’re not going to get rid of a free worker, who does great work.  I’ll have more on how to be great intern once you get the spot in the next part of the series.

If you have you have any questions about the process or what to do please feel free to leave a comment or email me.

Comments

  1. Wow, this is really helpful. I’m in NYC now but planning a move to DC in a month or two to try to break into Congressional work. Most advice I’ve found has been either very vague or outdated. Really appreciate your insight.

    I have a question, though – I have a Masters (in international relations, naturally) and actually did a 9 month (two semester) internship in my Senator’s office before (stupidly) leaving DC and losing most of my contacts on the hill. As someone who has experience with the hiring process, do you think that that previous hill experience would give me a leg up? Does it make sense for me to be applying to LC positions as well as hustling for an internship, or will my resume never see the light of day?

    Also, I’ve been told that offices frown on in-person resume drops, but it sounds like thats not the case?

    Anyway, again its great to hear from someone who’s recently been through this process.

    3 yearss ago
    • The Fool Reply

      I would certainly go ahead and apply for any open staff assistant or LC position you can find. The worst that will happen is you won’t hear back. Odds of cold applying are against but you might get lucky as well. Make sure and tailor your resume to the specific position you’re applying for, staff assistant, LC, etc. I’ll have more on that in a post tomorrow.

      I can say for certainty that drop offs aren’t frowned upon by the majority of house offices, and I would imagine it’s a regular thing on the senate side as well. It’s never a bad idea to put a face to the paper. What you shouldn’t do is call if it says no calls on the job postings. Dropping by each office to drop off your resume and cover letter for an internship is the most effective way outside an established intern program.

      I’d also advise you to try and get back in contact with the Senator’s office you interned with. The staff will probably be different due to turnover but it’s a good place to start looking for any openings.

      Having previous hill experience as an intern is a huge leg up on any competition you have. I would definitely put it prominent on your resume

      3 yearss ago
  2. Thanks for the advice. I’ll definitely visit the offices once I get to town.

    3 yearss ago
  3. Grant Reply

    This was incredibly helpful! Thanks. I know time has lapsed, but I’d still LOVE to read part 2 on cover letters and resumes.

    3 yearss ago
  4. Jerry Reply

    I just ran across this post in the process of looking for “go-to” information for my little brother, who wants to get started working in Congress. I left the Hill in 2011 for a job in the private sector, and I thought that I could add some things.
    First, you are absolutely right about IR majors. Every other young person on the Hill studied foreign affairs, and got into work on the Hill looking to make contributions to foreign policy – this is probably because it is much more exciting than say, agricultural policy. First, that is not going to happen. However, working on the Hill is probably the best “foot in the door” possible for someone with those aims, but lacks advanced degrees for top-tier IR programs (SAIS, SFS, UChicago, Princeton, HKS) or military experience.

    Getting an actual job on the Hill, about 95% percent of the time, starts with an internship on the Hill or experience on a congressional campaign. Personally, I didn’t have any campaign experience, so I can’t speak to that, but I can talk about my experience getting Hill internships, a position on a House committee, and how that experience got me both a good job in the private sector and admittance into one of those “top-tier IR” programs I mentioned before.

    I started looking for Hill internships during my 2nd year at the University of Virginia. I was double majoring in history and IR, but I didn’t want to be “the next Kissinger” or anything, I just wanted to have a list “prestigious looking” internships on my resume to supplement an application to law school (this, also, is very common). It also helped that my family lived in the northern Virginia area, and I could commute from their house to DC (which sounded simple and easy, but was not). The only political experience that I had at the time (besides my college major) was I had volunteered at the university’s public policy center – pretty much answering phones and setting up for lecture programs.

    First, you have to pick a party. I was, and still am, a solid centrist Independent – but, let me make this clear, no office wants to bring on an independent. Not even Sen. Lieberman or Sen. Sanders (the only “official” “independents” in Congress) want to hire independents. So, there is that – pick a party, or apply to both parties and say you are either a republican or democrat (what I did). Second, offices want to bring on interns and staff from their states, even better – their districts. Apply to those first.

    I started applying indiscriminantly across the aisle to House and Senate offices from my state, or adjacent ones – and following the instructions for internship applications listed on their websites about 7 months before a summer internship would begin. Nothing – no response.

    This approach is only marginally more effective than not applying at all. Thousands of people apply this way, and these email applications go to a mailbox that is only looked at when the office is in need of an intern. The way I got my first internship was off a special Hill and public policy oriented website, bradtraverse.com. The Brad Traverse job site and the Tom Manatos jobs List is absolutely the way to go. The sites update regularly for positions ranging from internships to top executives, and are compiled from actual people in the office putting up a notice – immediately. The best way to land an internship on the Hill is applying immediately to one of these postings. Though, the average person will still have to send numerous (probably 20-30 applications) before even getting a response. I ended up getting an interview in the beginning of June (I have been applying since December), and I started the internship the next Monday.

    My internship in the House was for a Republican member of a committee dealing with national security issues (I am being vague on purpose), the member was not from my home state. The intern experience was degrading, and overall I hated it. I was not paid (about 90% of the internships are un-paid), and my Metro commute cost me about $15 dollars a day – which breaks your back when you are not getting paid. The member I was working for never learned by name, and only spoke to me (incredibly briefly) twice. My main responsibility was answering the phone – I did a couple little research projects (which were largely calling up places and getting phone numbers for people or cutting and pasting personal bios on a word doc). I also lived at my parents house in northern Virginia, which meant an hour and a half commute each way. Honestly, my biggest concern the entire time was keeping my clothes clean, which was usually a crisis because I only had one suit, 4 ties, and maybe 5 shirts that I could wear. August is better because it is recess, and you can dress much more casually.

    Most other interns do not stay at their parent’s house, because they are from all over the county. They stay in group housing either on the Hill or close-by, and pay around $1,000 dollars a month to sleep in a bunk bed and share a room with up to 4 other people. And, DC is among the most expensive cities in the country, so unless your family is going to give you thousands of dollars a month to live on, expect utter poverty.

    For the next summer, I did not want to intern on the Hill, but I ended up doing it anyway – this time in the Senate (also for a senator not from my state). I had an internship lined up at a very large law firm, but it ended up falling through during my last month Spring semester due to “lack of funding”, so I put out applications on the Hill because I had done it before. Anyway, the Senate internship was much like the House, only the staff was more than twice as large and there were 5x the number of phonecalls. It also took a little longer to get to work because I had to walk further from the Capitol South Metro because I didn’t want to have to switch trains to get to Metro Center, which is closer to the Senate office buildings.

    So, my fourth year at UVa I applied to law school and got into most of the schools I applied to. I went to a good school, I double majored, my grades were good and my LSAT was very good, but I think the difference maker was my internships on the Hill and a reference letter from a well known senior Senator (though the letter was written by a staff assistant sitting right next to me). I cannot state this enough, recommendations from members of Congress are huge. If you want to go to law school or graduate school, the internship on your resume along with a recommendation letter is worth the intern experience.

    However, this was a time when unemployment was extremely high, and the horror stories of attorneys not being able to get jobs were all over the place (and force-fed to me by my mother and father, who are both attorneys), I decided to “defer” law school and look for jobs upon graduation. I thought if I could get into some of the best law schools in the county, I could get a regular job easily. Wrong.

    I applied to all kinds of jobs, hundreds, and got no response. Keep in mind I didn’t study business finance or engineering – I studied history and IR. And, I couldn’t get a job in DC’s booming national security industry because I didn’t have a TS-SCI clearance (which is an absolute prerequisite to any positions involving national security whatsoever). I couldn’t even get staff assistant or LC positions on the Hill. So, I interned again – in the same House office I started in. They only vaguely remembered me.

    By this time, the House congressman I had worked for now chaired the committee that he was on. Though it did not really change the internship at all. What that meant was instead of having more IR-based research projects, I had none. This is because he now had a whole team on the committee doing that work for him. Even our specialized LA, who used to handle the congressman’s committee work, had less committee work to do.

    But, after a couple of months, I got an email from the committee, they interviewed me, and I got a staff assistant job on the committee.

    Before I go into that, the main thing an intern learns is the makeup and staffing hierarchy in a congressional office. For legislative staff, it goes: Intern, Staff Assistant (is the same job as an intern and is usually promoted after being an intern, only get a salary (low) and has a degree and Hill experience), LC (usually promoted from Staff Assistant or sometime the positions are combined, writes form letters in response to constituent mail), LA (usually promoted from LC, monitors legislation pertaining to the member, or rather, monitors what the house leadership says and relays it to the LD), LD (usually promoted from Senior LA or is a fmr. Chief of Staff whose member retired or lost their seat, monitors legislation and relays information to the Chief of Staff), and the Chief (who is an absolute Hill veteran and is the member’s right hand, sometimes Chiefs are more of a member than the member). A great resource to see this information is Legistorm.com. The age of these people, very generally, are also relatively corresponding, interns are usually between 19-22, LCs 22-25, LA’s 24-30. LD’s and Chiefs have a wide age range, I have known a 26 year old LD and a 28 year old Chief, but they can also be much older, and Chiefs are usually in their 40’s-50’s. However, this is due to the TREMENDOUSLY HIGH turnover of staff on the Hill, which leads me to my next point.

    The pay on the Hill is extremely low, low for any professional job. This hardship is compounded by the fact that DC is an incredibly expensive area – if you want to live in a one-bedroom apartment in DC proper or the surrounded metropolitan areas in Virginia or Maryland, expect to pay $1,400-$1,800 a month for a standard apartment without a washer/dryer. Pay for personal office staff for House and Senate offices is: staff assistant (upper 20’s-low low 30’s), LC (30-low 30’s), LA (mid-30s-low 40’s depending on seniority). This means many junior staff have to live in group housing, or have restaurant/bar night jobs (which you also have to have experience in the industry to get) or be independently wealthy. The low pay means people quit, often. Working on the Hill makes staffers pretty marketable, and they usually leave when they get a job that allows them to live a lifestyle similar to their friends in the private sector.

    This also leaves openings in the offices, which are almost always given to in house staff or interns. Though, LC or LA jobs are commonly posted on Brad Traverse or other similar websites and list-servs, they almost always go to someone in the office, or someone who works for a member in a neighboring district, or someone who works for a member who works down the hallway. This isn’t to say that outside people are never hired, but it is very rare. If you do not work on the Hill already, it is almost impossible to get a job on the Hill. However, this means that there is tremendous mobility potential for an entry-level staffer. If someone comes in as an intern, and sticks with it until they can get a staff assistant or LC job, in 5 years they can go from being a junior staffer to a senior staffer.

    This is not the same for committee staff. All junior level committee staff are given the title of staff assistant, but this designation is not to be confused with a staff assistant in a personal office. Yes, committees hire interns (usually paid) to answer phones and they hire front office staff assistants to do the same, but most committee staff assistants are allocated amongst the committee’s subcommittees and do research and logistical work for PSMs, or Professional Staff Members. Staff assistants on committees make more money than almost all junior staff in personal offices, ranging between 37-42k. Though this is not a large salary, it is more livable. Working on a committee is also much more substantive than working in a personal office. In a personal office, the majority of the work caters solely on the member’s affairs, committees write bills. This is a big difference, and the work is much more interesting and resembles what an outsider would think working on the Hill is like. Being a staff assistant on a committee is also incredibly marketable. If you work on a committee dealing with IR, then the committee will put you in for a TS clearance, which is gold in the job market. Also, being able to say that you assisted in passed legislation catches employers/graduate school’s eye when the glance upon your resume.

    The downside to committee work is, for junior staff, there is almost zero possibility for advancement. Almost all PSMs, or Professional Staff Members, are experts in an area of expertise that is acquired off the Hill. PSMs for IR-related committees are former State Department employees or military officers, for Finance Committees, PSMs usually have significant experience in private business, or have Ivy League PhDs in economics. Senior committee staff, such as the Directors or Counsels, are usually former senior staffers in the personal offices of committee and subcommittee chairmen, or are former high ranking government officials or former executives.

    For me, I used my committee post to gain acceptance to a top-graduate school for IR. I applied to all the top tier schools I mentioned earlier, and I got into every single one of them. This is not because I had a 4.0 for undergrad (I didn’t), or because I destroyed the GRE (I didn’t do as well on the GRE as I did on the LSAT, mainly because I did not take a $1,500 prep course like I did for the LSAT, guess why? I was a low paid congressional staff member). The reason I got accepted into these schools was because I had worked on the committee. Straight up. If you want to get into one of those schools, this is probably the best route for almost near guaranteed admittance.

    I chose to attend Georgetown SFS, over all the other schools. I wanted to stay in DC, because that’s where the IR jobs are, and SFS is a more “practical” program than all others. Shortly after, I took a job in the private sector for more than double what I was making on the Hill – this job offer, also, I would have never had a chance getting without the Hill experience on my resume.

    This turned out to be much longer than I intended, so I will wrap it up. What do I make of this?

    Starting out on the Hill is tough. It’s almost impossible to get you foot in the door, and once you do, it is degrading work, nobody cares about you, you are not allowed to express opinions, blah. It is no fun, and it is definitely not for everybody. The people on the Hill can be very snobbish and act like they control world events. The self-importance of congressional staff is completely unjustified and laughable – you are an easily replaceable piece of a massive system: that’s it. The fact is, at least for IR, Congress does not create foreign policy at all. It oversees what is already happening. Committees will write appropriations bills for defense, intelligence, and foreign spending – but the policies written into these bills are largely put into place by the President. Most of the work a young staffer can expect to do is logistical or procedural. Not the kind of work that really “drives” anything, though necessary in its own way. The actual job is not glamorous, the hours can be long, and you will find yourself envious of people with other jobs who are able to do things like go to the beach or go somewhere that requires a plane, which you cannot afford to do.

    The thing is, if you want to get into policy work, it is one of the best first steps you can take. To get in, you do not need a masters degree, which for think tanks or intelligence community jobs is largely a prerequisite for consideration – and if you tough it out, you can take that next step. If you change your mind and decide to get out of policy work and move out of the area, a position working in Congress will be impressive to prospective employers – regardless of Congress’ almost always low approval rating.

    I cant say whether or not I would do it again, I’ve told this to my brother who is currently trying to get started on the Hill, but I am content with where I am now, and proud of myself for being in the position I am now.

    Another point mentioned in the post was summer vs. fall and spring internships. Yes, the summer internships are much more competitive – because a lot more people apply. Internships in the fall and spring are a bit less competitive because the applicants either go to school in the DC area or can intern for class credit for their university. My university didn’t accept internships for credit, but the people I knew who were doing an internship for credit usually only got 3-6 credits for the internship, and had to write papers about it. So that didn’t seem like the best deal to me. But, regardless, any time of year there is too much competition to simply look up legislators’ websites and apply for internships that way. To get an internship, you almost have to find one that has an immediate opening (that you have seen on one of the sites mentioned above) and apply immediately.

    It is best to have had a Hill internship before graduating college. Offices tend to be a bit nervous about bringing on an intern who has graduated for college because they know they are still looking for other jobs, on and off the Hill, and will leave the internship if they get a job. An intern who is still in college is viewed as more stable and not likely to quit before the internship ends. If a person who already has a degree gets an interview for an internship, he/she should say that they want to become a Hill staffer and hope to use the internship as preparation for a staff assistant or LC role, even if this is untrue. Expressing this intent will make the candidate seem less likely to bail.

    The first step is the internship. And if you want it, apply to several every day. Don’t even expect a response from any of them and you wont internalize the rejection and get frustrated. Just be tenacious about applying, and once you get in there stick it out, not matter how much it sucks. Eventually an office will bring you on as a staffer, it just may take a long time of not getting paid.

    Hope this helps.

    3 yearss ago
  5. Eric Reply

    How are internships in the local congressional office viewed on the Hill? In terms of becoming a paid staffer on the Hill?

    2 yearss ago
    • The Fool Reply

      They’re still looked upon very well. If all you can do is a district internship I would highly recommend it. Make sure and let the office know you’re looking to transition to full time work in DC during your internship so if anything pops up you might be considered. They’ll also be able to forward you any openings they hear about it friends offices.

      2 yearss ago
  6. Abi Reply

    What advice would you have for a Brit looking to get a Congressional job? I’ve got 2 years experience working full-time in the British Parliament for an MP, but I’d like to make the hop across the pond.

    Many thanks.

    2 yearss ago
    • The Fool Reply

      You might have an easier shot at landing without an internship based on previous experience. Depending on what legislative issues you covered I’d recommend putting feelers out to those committees. Also with your experience I’d check to see if the foreign affairs committee or any members on it are currently looking. Tom Manotos list and Brad Traverse site are both good listings for current jobs.

      2 yearss ago

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